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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
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Impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 pandemic on postgraduate medical education in armed forces medical services institutions: A students' perspective


1 Department of Ophthalmology, 7 Air Force Hospital, Nathu Singh Road, Kanpur Cantonment, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Ophthalmology, Command Hospital Air Force, Old Airport Road, Agram Post Bangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Nephrology, Command Hospital Air Force, Old Airport Road, Agram Post Bangalore, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Medicine, 7 Air Force Hospital, Nathu Singh Road, Kanpur Cantonment, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Debasish Mahapatra,
7 Air Force Hospital, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/injms.injms_64_22

Introduction: The Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic situation brings us the opportunity to test the strength and limitations of our health delivery system. Residents being the backbone of quality-health-delivery of any institute have taken the brunt. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire-based survey was used to assess the effect on medical training and stress of postgraduate residents in clinical specialties of armed forces institutions. Results: 266 valid responses were analyzed. Eighty-seven percent of residents felt their surgical/procedure-related training was affected. Bedside/clinical training was found to be affected by 92% and theoretical learning by 78%. A significant difference was found between residents in medical and allied specialties and residents in surgery and allied specialties (81% vs. 96.3%) with regard to the negative effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical/procedural skills training (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in the likelihood of being posted for COVID duties based on gender (P = 0.01) and year of the course (P = 0.004). Posting on COVID duties did not significantly affect surgical, clinical, or theoretical training. Of the respondents, 37%, 49%, and 14% had a mild, moderate, and severe increase in stress, respectively. 18%, 52%, and 30% experienced mild, moderate, and severe increased stress among family members. Gender, age, category, year of residency, or subject of specialization did not have any significant effect on the level of personal or family stress. Conclusion: This survey attempts to bring forth the effect of the pandemic on medical training schedules and stress among residents. Such surveys would enhance understanding and bring solutions to the problem that the pandemic has brought.


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    -  Nair N
    -  Khan MA
    -  Jha VK
    -  Mahapatra D
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